Janet_Crain
Hello!  My name is Janet (Tetzlaff) Crain and I am the Wesley Nurse at Hondo First United Methodist Church. 

 

The Wesley Nurse program is a faith-based, holistic health and wellness program committed to serving the least-served in their communities by providing health education, health promotion and facilitation of resources. The Wesley Nurse assists individuals and communities to achieve improved health and wellness through self-empowerment and access to health care resource information. The Wesley Nurse program spans 80 sites throughout South Texas and is Methodist Healthcare Ministries of South Texas, Inc.’s largest geographic outreach program. Learn more at 
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Some of the ongoing programs that available through the Wesley Nurse at Hondo FUMC include 2 exercise programs; Diabetes Education and Supplies Program; Specialty Referral Program; Prescription Assistance Program; and blood pressure and blood glucose screening.  As a Wesley Nurse, I cannot dispense or administer medication; diagnose or treat medical problems; or recommend medical treatments or medications. I have lived in Cotulla almost all my life, and graduated from Cotulla High School.  I have been a registered nurse since 1975.  I have 3 grown children:  Philip (wife Beth), who is a Department of Public Safety trooper in Frio County; George (wife Samantha), who is a plant supervisor in the oil industry; and Lauren (husband Rud Krisch), who is a physical therapist and clinic supervisor at Air Force Village I in San Antonio.  I have a total of 6 grand-angels, 3 boys and 3 girls, who are the brightest lights in my life.  I can attest to the fact that everything wonderful that has ever been said about being a grandparent is true! I retired after 30 years from the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), where I worked as a Public Health Nurse in LaSalle, Frio, Dimmit, and Zavala Counties.  I also became a certified Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner in 1986, and worked for many years in the DSHS Family Planning and Maternity Clinics.  To start my new career, I became a Wesley Nurse in 2010 at the Cotulla First United Methodist Church, and transferred to Hondo First United Methodist Church in September 2014.  I am excited about my move to Hondo First United Methodist Church, and look forward to the input of the congregation and community to do my part to better serve the under-served of Medina County.  What a privilege it is to serve God while working in a profession that I love!

The services of the Wesley Nurse are free and available to everyone in the community.  For more information on the Wesley Nurse programs, please call 830-426-5532, or email me at 
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Take Care of Your Smile! 

October is National Dental Hygiene Month.  As an adult, you are not immune to dental problems. In addition to maintaining a good home care routine, the most important thing that you can do is to schedule regular dental checkups and professional cleanings.  If you have good oral hygiene habits and a healthy mouth, your dentist and dental hygienist will probably suggest professional teeth cleaning at least twice a year. Many dental insurance policies will cover two cleanings per year, but few people take full advantage of their benefits.

This year, the awareness month is focusing on four routines that can help people maintain healthy smiles: brush, floss, rinse, and chew. According to MouthHealthy.org, the ADA’s consumer website, the ADA recommends brushing your teeth twice a day, for two minutes, with a soft-bristled brush. The size and shape of the brush should fit the mouth allowing you to reach all areas easily. The proper brushing technique is to:

  • Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums.
  • Gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes.
  • Brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth.
  • To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.
  • Brush your tongue to remove bacteria and keep your breath fresh.

  Although recent news reports have questioned the benefits of cleaning between your teeth, it is still an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums, according to MouthHealthy.org. The ADA recommends cleaning between your teeth once a day to remove plaque that is not removed by brushing. Plaque can eventually harden into calculus or tartar. Because teeth alone account for less than half of the mouth, rinsing can help eliminate bacteria that brushing and flossing cannot. Rinsing often, along with brushing and flossing, may help reduce the chance of dental decay and infection. However, avoid rinses that have alcohol in them, according to MouthHealthy.org. Lastly, clinical studies have shown that chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals can help prevent tooth decay. The chewing of sugarless gum increases the flow of saliva, which washes away food and other debris, neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth and provides disease-fighting substances throughout the mouth, according to MouthHealthy.org. The information for this article was taken from the Colgate https://www.colgate.com/   and Mouth Healthy https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en websites.  For more information, pick up the handouts from the health information table, or see me in my office.  

 
 
 
Tips for Healthy Aging
 

Do you think that it is too late to “reinvent” yourself?  According to Carolyn Worthington, editor-in-chief of Healthy Aging magazine, it is never too late to find a new career, a new sport, passion, or hobby.  Worthington is the creator of “September is Healthy Aging Month”, an annual health observance designed to focus national attention on the positive aspects of getting older and provide motivation and practical ideas for adults, ages 50-plus, to improve their physical, mental, social, and financial well-being. Use September as the motivation to take stock of where you’ve been, and what you would really like to do—and try it!  Who says that you can’t become an entrepreneur, start your own home business, test your physical prowess, or do something wildly different from anything that you have ever done before?  Only that person that you see in the mirror! Here are some ideas to get you started reinventing yourself.  Maybe they will help you think out of the box: ¨ Get moving—exercise regularly to maintain a healthy body and brain. ¨ Stay social—Take a class, volunteer, play games, see old friends, and make new ones. ¨ Bulk up—Eat beans and other high fiber foods for digestive and heart health. ¨ Add some spice—Add herbs and spices to your meals if medications dull your taste buds. ¨ Stay balanced—Practice yoga or tai chi to improve agility and prevent falls. ¨ Take a hike—Brisk daily walks can bolster both your heart and lungs. ¨ Sleep well—Talk to a sleep specialist if you don’t sleep soundly throughout the night. ¨ Beat the blues—If you have been feeling down for a while, see a doctor.  Depression can be treated. ¨ Don’t forget—To aid your memory, make lists, follow routines, slow down, and organize.  ¨ Every few months, review your over-the-counter drugs with your doctor for any potentially unsafe ingredients. ¨ Be positive in conversations and your actions every day.  When you catch yourself complaining, check yourself and change the conversation to something positive. ¨ Do you have negative friends who complain all the time?  Distance yourself or they will only depress you and stop you from moving forward. ¨  Smile!—Research show that people who smile more often are happier. ¨ Make September the month to set up your annual physical and other health screenings—and keep your appointments.  And don’t forget about taking care of your oral health.  Your teeth are just as important to your good health as the rest of your body. ¨ Find you inner artist—Take music lessons, painting classes, or a wood-working class. There is no better time to start than now! The information for this article was condensed from the Healthy Aging  https://healthyaging.net/ and WebMD https://www.webmd.com/ websites.  For more information, pick up the handouts from the health information table, or see me in my office. Blessings!           Janet Crain, RN, Wesley Nurse   Janet Crain, RN, is a Wesley Nurse with Methodist Healthcare Ministries of South Texas, Inc. Methodist Healthcare Ministries’ Wesley Nurse program is a faith-based, holistic health and wellness program committed to serving the least served through education, health promotion and collaboration with individual and community in achieving improved wellness through self-empowerment. Learn more at www.mhm.org.  

Health & Fitness

on Tuesday & Thursday

 in the Fellowship Hall
 
 
Walk Aerobics
(active group)
9:00 am
 
 
Sit-n-Stretch
(low impact)
at 10:00 am
 
 

Adult Immunization Recommendations

Your need for immunization doesn’t end when you become an adult. Regardless of age, we all need immunizations to protect against serious, and sometimes deadly, diseases. Protection from vaccines you received as a child can wear off over time, and more vaccines are now available. It can be very confusing because new vaccines are being developed all the time, and the immunization recommendations change periodically.  The specific vaccines you need as an adult are determined by your age, job, lifestyle, health conditions, travel destinations, and which vaccines you’ve had in the past. Throughout your adult life, vaccines are recommended for protection against:
  1. 1.Influenza–Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death.  Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others. Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every season. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body that protect against flu. At the beginning of each new flu season, CDC recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October, if possible.  Getting vaccinated later, however, can still be beneficial and vaccination should continue to be offered throughout the flu season, even into January or later.
  2. Td (Tetanus and diphtheria) and Tdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis or whooping cough)-Adults should get one dose of the tetanus and diphtheria (Td) vaccine every 10 years. For adults who did not get Tdap as a preteen or teen, they should get one dose of Tdap in place of a Td dose to boost protection against whooping cough. However, adults who need protection against whooping cough can get Tdap at any time, regardless of when they last got Td.
  3. Shingles— Shingles vaccination is the only way to protect against shingles and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the most common complication from shingles. CDC recommends that healthy adults 50 years and older get two doses of the shingles vaccine called Shingrix (recombinant zoster vaccine), separated by 2 to 6 months, to prevent shingles and the complications from the disease. Shingrix is the preferred vaccine over Zostavax® (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shingles/public/zostavax/index.html) (zoster vaccine live), a shingles vaccine in use since 2006.  Healthy adults 50 years and older should get two doses of Shingrix, separated by 2 to 6 months.

You should get Shingrix even if in the past:

* you had shingles– If you had shingles in the past, you can get Shingrix to help prevent future occurrences of the disease. There is no specific length of time that you need to wait after having shingles before you can receive Shingrix, but generally you should make sure the shingles rash has gone away before getting vaccinated.

* received Zostavax– If you had Zostavax in the recent past, you should wait at least eight weeks before getting Shingrix

* are not sure if you had chickenpox– You can get Shingrix whether or not you remember having had chickenpox in the past. Studies show that more than 99% of Americans 40 years and older have had chickenpox, even if they don’t remember having the disease.

  1. Pneumococcal disease— There are two kinds of vaccines that help prevent pneumococcal disease: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or Prevnar 13 )—Recommended for all adults age 65 and over, but can be given under age 65 for persons with certain medical conditions. It is recommended that the PCV 13 be administered first, followed by PPSV 23 at least 1 year later. The two pneumococcal vaccines should not be administered at the same time.

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 or Pneumovax23)– Recommended for all adults age 65 and over, but can be given under age 65 for persons with certain medical conditions.  If the PPSV23 vaccine has already been administered, the PCV13 can be given at least 1 year later. 

Other vaccines you may need according to your health conditions include those that protect against human papillomavirus (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/hpv/public/index.html) (which can cause certain cancers),
 
Ask your doctor which vaccines are right for you. Immunization is one of the safest ways for you to protect your health. Vaccine side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Severe side effects are very rare.  Adults can get vaccines at doctors’ offices, pharmacies, workplaces, community health clinics, health departments, and other locations.  Most health insurance plans cover recommended vaccines. Check with your insurance provider for details and for a list of vaccine providers. If you do not have health insurance, visit www.healthcare.gov to learn more about health insurance options.

Get vaccinated to protect yourself and your loved ones from serious diseases.

The information for this article was condensed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website:  https://www.cdc.gov/features/adultimmunizations/index.html

For more information, pick up the handouts from the health information table, or see me in my office.

 

Blessings!          

Janet Crain, RN, Wesley Nurse

 

Janet Crain, RN, is a Wesley Nurse with Methodist Healthcare Ministries of South Texas, Inc. Methodist Healthcare Ministries’ Wesley Nurse program is a faith-based, holistic health and wellness program committed to serving the least served through education, health promotion and collaboration with individual and community in achieving improved wellness through self-empowerment. Learn more at www.mhm.org.

 

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